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Improving Efficiency and Extending the Life of Household Appliances Using Filtered Water By Nathan Marks



More than four out of 10 Americans use home water treatment units, ranging from water pitchers and stations to more sophisticated whole house systems.

More than four out of 10 Americans use home water treatment units, ranging from water pitchers and stations to more sophisticated whole house systems.¹ Many homeowners use water filtration products to provide cleaner, better tasting drinking water, but the need for filtered water goes far beyond drinking. Water quality affects the efficiency and longevity of plumbing and appliances.

There are many factors that can impact water at home, though you may not be able to detect them without help. Consult your local water treatment facility to have your water tested. If you want to improve the quality of your water, install the do-it-yourself Filtrete High Performance Whole-House System designed to filter incoming household water and reduce the elements that cause some of these common problems:

• Walls and Baseboards: Washing machine: The presence of sediment can partially or fully clog the washer's inlet filter screens, decreasing or stopping water flow to the appliance.

Sinks and Toilets: You may periodically notice rust particles in sink water or toilet bowls. This usually means there may be corrosion in your plumbing system that causes the water to pick up and carry rust as it travels through the pipes.

Dishwasher: The presence of sediment can partially or fully clog the dishwasher's inlet filter screens, decreasing or stopping water flow to the appliance.

Water Heaters: If you notice any popping noises or other sounds coming from your water heater, sediment may have built up at the bottom of the system. This build-up can clog the drain valve and potentially decrease the efficiency of the system. In electric water heaters, sediment build-up can cover the heating element and cause the system to overheat and burn out.

Tap Water: Sediment may be visible or present in dispensed water or beverages mixed using tap water. Although it does not pose any health risks, it can be unpleasant to drink and cook with in the kitchen.

¹United States Environmental Protection Agency, "Water Health Series: Filtration Facts."
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/faq/pdfs/fs_healthseries_filtration.pdf